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I was helping my sister out with a garage sale today, and after it was all said and done, she decided she wanted the extra leftovers in her shed so she could sell them again next weekend when the newspaper ad was actually IN the newspaper. :-/ Thanks for hi-jacking the post guys [img]images/graemlins/grin.gif[/img] It looked kind of mummified.. In another old house I found a huge pile of stamps dating back to WW II.

So I open the door of the little 10X10 shed and there's a dead squirrel on the floor. So I bribe my younger brother to remove it and toss it under the shed. This is like the 4th time i've found something cool in my sisters house.. and you could see the skin receding up the leg bones : P I can't belive I forgot my digi camera. I found six new creepers in a box on the side of the road. Not me but someone I know found a set of mexican silver spurs inside some wood he was splitting for firewood, that was cool!

I'm guessing it has been a prime hunting spot for a long time. These smaller caliber rifles were known as "pea" rifles back then, now a days, we tend to call them squirrel rifles.

Yesterday, I stopped for a half hour after work and found this metal ball.

This was in a spot at least three miles from the nearest highway bridge and 1700 or so miles from NV.

I found this at an 1800's site I've been working intermittently. How thick are your fingers...is smallish, but there were small calibre muzzleloading revolvers and derringers. Even though that round mark on top suggests that it was cast. Give some size and material info and we'll return to the subject. The round area could be from two things: The sprue from the field mold casting or the ram made it when loading. Originally Posted by xd35 View post It looks to be. Another handy tool to have for measuring the ball or bullet. Rifles EAST of the Missippippi tended to shrink in Caliber after about 1800, as most of the big game was gone.

It's been slow going as I have been forced to a small area of the property to allow for bow hunters. The round area could be from two things: The sprue from the field mold casting or the ram made it when loading. Rifles in .40 to .45 were common, but smaller caliber rifles were made as well.

So far, I have found head stamps dating late 1800's through modern. I've personally handled an original rifle that mic'd at .31 caliber.

"Centerforce" is hardly distinguishable through the dust. Gold from time to time, a few guns (I don't keep those [img]images/graemlins/shocked.gif[/img]), CD's, tools by the trunkload and whatever. [img]images/graemlins/puke.gif[/img] About six weeks ago, a bunch of use were Jeepin down the river here in Nebraska when General420 found an old license plate laying in the sand in the middle channel. Still looked like something out of the 1960s First thing that came to mind for me was All About Sports in Erlanger where the post office is now..was in the same building as Van Leunen's, which I believe is a gym these days. I went to the Roy Rogers on the east side of Cincy a couple of years ago, it has since closed. Lots of cool stuff in that store, and I had some great perks from working there. Another handy tool to have for measuring the ball or bullet. As many as you will probably be finding you may want to invest in a digital micrometer. As many as you will probably be finding you may want to invest in a digital micrometer.

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